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On Thursday 12th March 2020 we held our usual weekly staff meeting/development session in the Centre for […]
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This is the remote teaching guidance developed by colleagues in the Centre for Innovation in Education at […]
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The U.S. Marines apparently came up with the design principle "keep it simple, stupid" (KISS) hence the title of this post, and so having been reflecting on the complex nature of curriculum design (and a concern that this complexity might in fact negatively impact the quality of that curriculum) I set out to consider what curriculum development might look like if we simplified the process & expectations of it.
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Learning Technologists often have significant technological and pedagogical expertise, but to what extent does their role title affect the perception of others about what they do?
Imagine a University that values curriculum design and learning & teaching so much that they give staff significant dedicated time to lead on and undertake this activity.
When we ask teams to innovate and think differently about the way they might want to teach we end up in a chicken and egg situation
Strategies, action plans, guidelines, polices and frameworks are pervasive in H.E. Often the lines between them are blurred.
It's not about making everyone use digital tools for the sake of it, but asking that everyone engages in the understanding of them to make informed decisions.
Programme / Course level curriculum design is complex and should not be rushed. In this post I outline my overarching approach to this. Having supported numerous Course teams through this process in various subject areas over the years, I have consistently drawn upon Biggs’ constructive alignment model which has underpinned my approach to this work and in my experience transcends disciplines.

Having used the TPACK framework as an approach to digitally embedded academic development, I have rarely experienced […]